Categories
NFL News

Tom Pidcock won Olympic gold in men’s mountain biking cross country at the Tokyo Olympics.

Tom Pidcock won gold in his Olympic debut in Tokyo Tom Pidcock added to Great Britain’s Olympic gold medal tally by winning the men’s mountain bike cross country on Day Three of the Tokyo Games.
After a fantastic ride on his Olympic debut, the 21-year-old crossed the finish line draped in a Union flag at the Izu Mountain Bike Course, only half an hour after Tom Daley and Matty Lee added a second gold of the day.
Britain had won one silver and one bronze in the first two days, but Monday began an incredible run.
With a strong swim to defend his 100m breaststroke championship, Adam Peaty gave Britain its first gold of the postponed Tokyo Games, while Daley and Lee teamed together to capture the men’s 10m synchronised platform diving gold.
On Monday, Alex Yee added a silver medal to his Games tally in the men’s triathlon.
This is a breaking Olympic news story that will be updated as more information becomes available.
Please return to this page to see the most recent changes.
Sky Sports will provide you with live updates as they occur.
Get the latest sports news, commentary, exclusive interviews, replays, and highlights delivered straight to your inbox.
Sky Sports is your go-to destination for breaking sports news and live updates.
Watch live coverage of your favorite sports, including football, Formula One, boxing, cricket, golf, tennis, rugby league, rugby union, NFL, darts, and netball, and stay up to date on the latest transfers, results, and scores.
For all the latest sports news, go to skysports.com or download the Sky Sports App.
For the latest news from your favorite sports, you can receive push alerts from the Sky Sports app, and you can also follow @SkySportsNews on Twitter.

Categories
NFL News

Treat members of the US Tokyo Olympic delegation as though they are unvaccinated.

By Ben Morse, Jill Martin, Coy Wire, CNN The United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC) announced on Friday that more over three-quarters of American athletes in Japan for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics have received Covid-19 immunizations.
Team USA confirmed earlier this month that 613 individuals will compete in the Summer Games for the country.
When athletes arrive in Japan, they must fill out health history forms.
Due to the fact that several US athletes have still to arrive, the overall number of health histories answered is “almost” 600, according to USOPC head medical officer Dr.
According to Jonathan Finnoff,
He stated that he did not know the actual figure.
“As of today, it’s 83%,” Finnoff said during a press conference on Friday, referring to vaccinated athletes.
“Those are merely athletes.”
The 83% ratio should worry Team USA, according to CNN sports analyst Christine Brennan, who raised her concerns over the “alarmingly low” percentage of vaccinated American competitors in the Gasparilla Games.
“This number — 83 percent — is dangerously low,” she wrote on Twitter, “given that your chances of being contact tracked out of your event increase dramatically if you are not vaccinated.”
“Moreover, you’re a bigger risk to your teammates, roommates, and so on.” ‘Health and safety procedures’ Finnoff added that all members of the US delegation in Tokyo, whether athletes, employees, or volunteers, are treated as if they haven’t been vaccinated.
“If someone asks me if the Games should go on, I can emphatically reply that they should go on,” Finnoff added.
“I think the health and safety precautions that have been implemented are extraordinary, and I’m very certain we can have a safe and successful Games,” he said. The National Football League (NFL) announced on Thursday that any Covid-19 outbreak among unvaccinated players or staff members will result in the club forfeiting that week’s game and being “charged with a loss” if the game cannot be rescheduled during the 18-week window.
With clubs reporting for training camp this week, the NFL saw an surge in Covid-19 immunization rates around the league, with 14 of the 32 NFL teams above the 85% mark, according to the league.
The NFL also announced that 78% of players in the league have received at least one immunization, up 4% from the previous week.
According to the NFL, all 32 teams are now above the 50% vaccine criteria, up from two teams last week which had fewer than half of their players immunized.
Four American competitors have already had to withdraw from the Games after testing positive for Covid-19.
Taylor Crabb of men’s beach volleyball, Coco Gauff of tennis, Katie Lou Samuelson of basketball, and Kara Eaker of gymnastics will skip the Olympics since they must now isolate themselves.
A total of 339.8 million doses have been provided in the United States.
This equals 102 dosages per 100 persons.
“I would invite not only the American public, but everyone across the world to embrace these Games,” USOPC CEO Sarah Hirshland said. “We can run these Games in a safe and healthy atmosphere, and we should enjoy the pleasure and spirit of what this competition is all about.”
“Let us enjoy these Games as much as we always have and allow them to inspire and unite as they should, as they can, and as I am convinced they will.” A legendary walk Out of the 613 US athletes competing at the Games, more than 200 plan to attend Friday’s Opening Ceremony, according to Rick Adams, USOPC chief of sport performance and national governing body services.
For more sports news, features, and videos, go to CNN.com/sport. “What you had was a situation where the stay guidelines, in terms of not arriving until five days before your competition, limited the number of athletes who may normally be walking,” Adams explained.
“We’ll have a much smaller group, but that’s not due to a limitation imposed by the organizing committee.”
That’s just a result of the athletes who are here because of their competition window and those who have chosen to walk.” 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. The-CNN-Wire ™ & (c) 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company.
All intellectual property rights are reserved.
This report was co-authored by Homero De la Fuente and Jacob Lev.

Categories
NFL News

As the early events at the Tokyo Olympics get begun, Japan thrashes Australia in softball.

As far as first pitches go, this one was far from ceremonial.
When Yukiko Ueno, a 39-year-old pitcher, hit the first pitch of Japan’s Olympic softball pool match against Australia, it finally signaled the start of a Games that had been delayed by a year and were still being questioned even as they began.
Only hours before, Toshiro Muto, the head of the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee, had given a very flat-bat response, prompting a new round of headlines highlighting the possibility of the most 11th-hour of 11th-hour cancellations, and the argument will undoubtedly continue for the next three weeks, and most likely into next months Paralympics as well.
Although the Games do not officially begin until Friday night’s opening ceremony, there will be some relief that they are now begun in some sense, with baseball and football games slated to begin on “Day minus two.”
Recovery was made a primary subject of these Games long before the pandemic, and they were always scheduled to begin 150 miles from Tokyo in Fukushima, the site of the 2011 nuclear disaster, but the symbolic impact was nothing like what had been envisioned so long ago.
“It’s a bit of a letdown,” Ueno stated afterward.
“We wanted to demonstrate our performance in front of the people of Fukushima, who have put in a lot of effort to rebuild Fukushima.” We’ll have to get used to seeing empty bleachers again, just as we seem to have done in the UK, but the return of softball and baseball to the Olympic schedule for the first time since 2008 still promises to be a source of excitement.
Baseball is Japan’s most popular sport, and its premier league, Nippon Professional Baseball, is the world’s fifth most popular domestic league, trailing only the NFL, Bundesliga, Premier League, and AFL.
While the men will be vying for their first Olympic gold, the Japanese women are the defending softball champions, having defeated the United States in an upset victory in Beijing.
It was fitting that the lady who struck out the United States to take gold was back 13 years later to kick-off this tournament as Japan began their defense in excellent form, with a smashing win against Australia.
“I was actually trying to calm down before the game and not let myself get unduly enthusiastic about this opportunity to go back to the mound for the Olympics,” said Ueno, who got off to a rough start, giving up the opening run on a hit-by-pitch before recovering as Minori Naito and Yamato Fujita each hit home runs in an 8-1 rout that was called after five innings.

Categories
NFL News

As the early events at the Tokyo Olympics get begun, Japan thrashes Australia in softball.

As far as first pitches go, this one was far from ceremonial.
When Yukiko Ueno, a 39-year-old pitcher, hit the first pitch of Japan’s Olympic softball pool match against Australia, it finally signaled the start of a Games that had been delayed by a year and were still being questioned even as they began.
Only hours before, Toshiro Muto, the head of the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee, had given a very flat-bat response, prompting a new round of headlines highlighting the possibility of the most 11th-hour of 11th-hour cancellations, and the argument will undoubtedly continue for the next three weeks, and most likely into next months Paralympics as well.
Although the Games do not officially begin until Friday night’s opening ceremony, there will be some relief that they are now begun in some sense, with baseball and football games slated to begin on “Day minus two.”
Recovery was made a primary subject of these Games long before the pandemic, and they were always scheduled to begin 150 miles from Tokyo in Fukushima, the site of the 2011 nuclear disaster, but the symbolic impact was nothing like what had been envisioned so long ago.
“It’s a bit of a letdown,” Ueno stated afterward.
“We wanted to demonstrate our performance in front of the people of Fukushima, who have put in a lot of effort to rebuild Fukushima.” We’ll have to get used to seeing empty bleachers again, just as we seem to have done in the UK, but the return of softball and baseball to the Olympic schedule for the first time since 2008 still promises to be a source of excitement.
Baseball is Japan’s most popular sport, and its premier league, Nippon Professional Baseball, is the world’s fifth most popular domestic league, trailing only the NFL, Bundesliga, Premier League, and AFL.
While the men will be vying for their first Olympic gold, the Japanese women are the defending softball champions, having defeated the United States in an upset victory in Beijing.
It was fitting that the lady who struck out the United States to take gold was back 13 years later to kick-off this tournament as Japan began their defense in excellent form, with a smashing win against Australia.
“I was actually trying to calm down before the game and not let myself get unduly enthusiastic about this opportunity to go back to the mound for the Olympics,” said Ueno, who got off to a rough start, giving up the opening run on a hit-by-pitch before recovering as Minori Naito and Yamato Fujita each hit home runs in an 8-1 rout that was called after five innings.