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Cole Beasley, Gabriel Davis, and Star Lotulelei of the Buffalo Bills have been placed in quarantine after being considered close contacts.

NEW YORK’S BUFFALO
— Wide receivers Cole Beasley and Gabriel Davis of the Buffalo Bills will miss the next five days of practice after being identified as close contacts of a team trainer who tested positive for COVID-19, according to a league source.
According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, defensive tackle Star Lotulelei is also under quarantine.
After testing negative for the virus on Tuesday morning, all three players are required to skip practice per to the NFL’s COVID-19 policy.
According to Schefter, the trainer is completely vaccinated.
The news of Beasley and Davis being quarantined was first reported by the New York Daily News.
The NFL’s policy, which severely restricts unvaccinated athletes while allowing vaccinated players to return to near-normalcy, drew criticism from Beasley in June, when he tweeted that he was not vaccinated and would “enjoy my one life like I want.”
If they are close contacts with someone who tests positive for COVID-19, unvaccinated players must stay away from the team for five days; vaccinated players do not have to quarantine if they are close contacts with someone who tests positive for COVID-19.
Unvaccinated players are needed to be checked everyday under the policy controlling preseason and training camp, whereas vaccinated players are only required to be tested every two weeks, according to Beasley.
“It’s self-evident that if a vaxxed or unvaxxed athlete is tested less frequently, the chances of being removed for COVID diminish drastically,” Beasley said.
“In terms of player safety, I’ll just say that we all want to be safe,” Beasley said. Beasley was the Bills’ second-leading receiver in 2020, with 967 yards on 82 catches, both career highs.
During his rookie season last year, Davis had the second-most receiving touchdowns on the team with seven.

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According to reports, the Patriots are dissatisfied with Cam Newton’s handling of the COVID process.

Due to a breach of COVID-19 guidelines, Cam Newton will miss what many perceive to be vital practice time this week, and there are apparently some people within the New England Patriots organization who aren’t thrilled with the former NFL MVP.
Newton will be suspended for five days, according to the Patriots, due to a “misunderstanding” with the NFL’s COVID-19 protocols.
On Saturday, the quarterback was away from the squad for club-approved medical care, but he failed to adhere to established testing protocols.
Newton, who is unvaccinated, missed a day of testing despite the fact that he was tested outside of the Patriots’ facilities and came up negative.
Unvaccinated players must undergo daily testing at an NFL-approved facility.
According to NFL Network’s Michael Giardi, the Patriots are frustrated with Newton’s predicament internally.
Newton’s absence, according to one “key” member of the organization, will open the door for rookie Mac Jones to earn the starting quarterback job.

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NFL News

Falcons eliminated two unvaccinated players to reach a 100% COVID-19 vaccination percentage, according to reports.

The Atlanta Falcons made waves on Monday when they announced that all of their players have been vaccinated against COVID-19.
Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk provided an update on the subject on Thursday.
According to Florio, the Falcons eliminated two unvaccinated players as part of their recent roster cutting, bringing the team’s immunization percentage to 100%.
Since the spring, both the NFL and the NFL Players Association have stated that players cannot be forced to acquire coronavirus vaccines in order to preserve their roster positions, but it has been generally assumed for months that so-called “fringe” or “bubble” players may be cut during training camp and/or the preseason if they refused to get one of the available and safe vaccines.

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The Atlanta Falcons are the first NFL team to have all of their players immunized against COVID-19.

Before Saturday’s preseason game against the Miami Dolphins, the Atlanta Falcons have created some important history.
On Monday, the Falcons verified that all of its players have been completely vaccinated against COVID-19.
They are the first team in the NFL to have all of their players vaccinated.
“Each player will now benefit from being able to work out and eat among their teammates,” Scott Bair wrote for the club’s website.
“They won’t have to test every day, they won’t have to wear masks around the facility, and they won’t have to quarantine if a close contact with someone who tests positive.” As shown this summer, even with fully vaccinated staff, MLB teams like the New York Yankees have had positive COVID-19 test results.
The goal is that the safe and readily available immunizations will prevent an outbreak inside a club, which may prevent that team from playing on a planned date once the regular season begins in September.
If a team is forced to forfeit this fall because to a COVID-19 epidemic among unvaccinated employees, getting as many players completely vaccinated as possible before Week 1 is in everyone’s best interests.
Despite the fact that 90% of players league-wide had received at least one injection at the time, Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk said last week that “a ton” of elite players are opposed to the vaccine.
The NFL has made it clear that it wants all players completely vaccinated as quickly as possible, but the league and the NFL Players Association have stated that players cannot be cut only because they are not fully vaccinated.

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NFL News

The NHLPA’strongly encourages’ players to get completely vaccinated, and warns that failure to do so could result in serious sanctions.

According to Michael Russo and Katie Strang of The Athletic, the NHL Players’ Association “highly pushed” players to get completely vaccinated against COVID-19 last week and warned them of potential consequences if they did not.
If players are not vaccinated and contract COVID-19 during the 2021-22 season, they may forfeit salary.
The Athletic notes that teams may withhold salary if an unvaccinated athlete is unable to accompany his team on road trips where municipal or federal authorities demand vaccination to enter.
“That puts a lot of pressure on everyone,” a player who did not want to be identified told The Athletic.
“You don’t want to be the reason your team is shorthanded or forced to stay in your hotel like last season,” many player agents told The Athletic. “They have urged their clients” to follow vaccine recommendations.
Players who are unsure about the immunization should speak with their doctors, according to the agents.
More than 85% of NHL players have been completely immunized, according to NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly.
Yet, this is lower than the other main professional sports leagues in North America.
The NFL, like the NBA, has a vaccination percentage of around 90%.
According to The Athletic, the NHL is unlikely to require players to be vaccinated.
Unvaccinated players, on the other hand, may face tougher restrictions and protocols.
The NHL and NHLPA are still debating protocols for the 2019 season, but with the delta variation on the rise across the country, those protocols could be identical to last season’s.
According to The New York Times, more than 128,000 new COVID-19 cases were recorded on Friday.
That’s a 66% rise in the last 14 days.
Furthermore, 651 deaths were reported on Friday, an increase of 116% in just 14 days.

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COVID-19 vaccines are rejected by “a ton” of top NFL players?

Since the spring, the NFL and the NFL Players Association have stated that players are not required to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to compete in the next regular season. However, unvaccinated players can be penalized $14,650 each time they breach health and safety rules connected to the epidemic.
Those who remain unvaccinated must adhere to tight criteria similar to those in place for the 2020 campaign before vaccines became widely available, so players who refuse to get the shots will, on paper, “have a rougher time” from August to the end of the season.
In discussing the possibility of the NFL and NFLPA agreeing to required player vaccines, Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk said that “a ton” of great players are opposed to the vaccine, and that mandated player coronavirus vaccines “won’t happen and can’t happen,” according to a source from “the management side of the ledger.”
If those ratings rise or fall after clubs trim rosters later this month, it might lead to some unpleasant locker-room conversations, especially among the league’s lowest-rated teams.

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Cole Beasley, a wide receiver for the Buffalo Bills, believes the NFL’s vaccine grievance stems from uneven standards, and he wants players to get ‘correct knowledge.’

NEW YORK’S BUFFALO
— Buffalo Bills wide receiver Cole Beasley, who has been vocal in his opposition to the NFL’s COVID-19 vaccination policy, attempted to clarify his position on Wednesday, claiming his issue with the league is the disparity in standards between vaccinated and unvaccinated players.
“I’m neither anti-vax or for-vax — I’m pro choice,” Beasley said after the Bills’ first practice of training camp, reading from a prepared statement.
“With that said, the issue at hand is withholding information from players in order to sway a player in a route he may not be comfortable with.”
“When it comes to a player’s health and safety, information that is critical in the decision-making process should be completely transparent.”
A player may feel misled and unsure about a particularly personal decision if they do not have all of the necessary facts.
The NFL’s policy, which severely restricted unvaccinated athletes while allowing vaccinated players to return to near-normalcy, drew criticism from Beasley last month, when he tweeted that he was not vaccinated and would “live my one life what I wa.”
Nevertheless, it was the frequency of testing that Beasley was most critical of; under the regulation controlling preseason and training camp, unvaccinated players will be needed to be tested daily, while vaccinated players will only be obliged to test every two weeks.
“It’s obvious reasoning that if a vaxed or unvaxed player is tested less frequently, the chances of being removed for COVID reduce drastically,” he explained.
“In terms of player safety, I’ll just say that we all want to be safe.”
“For a lot of NFL players, safety doesn’t only mean avoiding the COVID virus.”
“Our health is now and in the future, which we are trying to safeguard with our personal choice while doing everything we did in our protocol during a very successful 2020 NFL season,” said Bills general manager Brandon Beane on Wednesday.
Beane also stated that he does not feel that Beasley’s or any other player’s social media comments about the vaccine will detract from the team’s overall focus now that training camp has started.
“Sometimes things goes out in social media,” Beane added, “and you don’t know how to interpret it.”
“You know, I’ve had quite a few discussions with a few of the men.”
It’s a challenge.
Men are attempting to educate themselves and consider all perspectives.
Yet, we have professionals on staff, and we allow them to share their opinions.
“As long as it’s not going to be a distraction, and Sean (McDermott) and I have both made that point.”
We don’t think anything is wrong.
I believe you’ll be able to tell where our boys are focused once we’re out on the turf playing football.
Last season, Beasley set a career high with 967 receiving yards on 82 catches in his second season with the Bills.

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According to reports, 18 NFL teams have vaccinated at least 90% of their players against COVID-19.

On the same day that allegations broke that Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson tested positive for COVID-19 for the second time since last fall, there is some good news in the league’s fight to continue playing despite the growing pandemic.
According to Myles Simmons of Pro Football Talk, 18 NFL clubs have at least 90% of their players vaccinated against COVID-19, up from 14 teams the day before.
In addition, 86.9% of players in the league have had at least one vaccination shot.
As of Tuesday, that figure stood at 85%.
The league previously warned teams that if a club achieves an 85% vaccination rate among players, several health and safety standards can be relaxed.
The NFL and the NFL Players Association are not requiring players to get vaccinated in order to participate in the upcoming season, but the NFL has threatened that if teams were unable to play during a week due to a COVID-19 outbreak among unvaccinated individuals, they would be forced to forfeit.
The league has also stated that game checks for contests that were not played due to coronavirus-related difficulties could be withheld, and that unvaccinated players could be punished each time they breach COVID-19 protocols.
In summary, when Minnesota Vikings coach Mike Zimmer indicated last month that unvaccinated players will “have a harder time” from the start of training camp through the end of the season, he wasn’t kidding.

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Lamar Jackson, the Ravens’ standout quarterback, will miss training camp due to a COVID-19-related concern.

While Jackson was not present at practice on Wednesday, Trace McSorley and Tyler Huntley are expected to take the majority of the snaps at quarterback, according to Schefter.
Kenji Bahar is the third-string quarterback at practice.
After testing positive for COVID-19 during the 2020 season, Jackson missed one game.
He has refused to say whether he has been vaccinated when reporters have asked him about it this summer.
In recent weeks, vaccination has become a heated topic in the NFL, with the league issuing a statement indicating that teams with COVID-19 outbreaks among unvaccinated players will be forced to forfeit games if they can’t be rescheduled within the 18-week schedule.
Unvaccinated NFL players will be fined $14,650 each time they breach COVID-19 protocols, according to the league.
Some NFL players, like DeAndre Hopkins and Matt Judon, have criticised the league for its handling of unvaccinated players, stating that getting immunized is a personal choice.
While some athletes are still refusing to get the vaccine, Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back Leonard Fournette has stated that he is at least contemplating it if it is in his and his teammates’ best interests.

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As training camps get underway, the NFL is doubling down on immunizations.

When NFL training camps open for the season, two things are becoming abundantly clear: league officials are committed to playing — and finishing — on time.
The first is that, while COVID-19 vaccinations are quite successful, they are not without flaws.
It was evident Monday, when Indianapolis disclosed that despite being properly vaccinated, coach Frank Reich had tested positive for the virus.
The second point to consider is that players who refuse to get vaccinated have a slim chance of playing a complete season of football this autumn.
The NFL is tough on immunizations, much to the chagrin of a few players who can’t seem to grasp that vaccines are overwhelmingly beneficial.
If players arrive at camp without their shots, they may expect a lot of testing, hefty fines, and a lot more if they develop COVID-19 cases that cause the season to be disrupted.
They also run the risk of being shunned by their teammates, who believe that having their vaccinations demonstrated a better understanding of how vaccines and big business function.
It’s debatable whether this is sufficient to bring all players to their senses.
Some have voiced their displeasure on social media, such Buffalo receiver Cole Beasley, who said last month that he would retire rather than get the vaccine.
Two assistant coaches have reportedly lost their jobs as a result of their refusal to be vaccinated.
Nonetheless, four out of every five NFL players have received at least one dosage of the vaccination as of the end of last week.
As camps open and gamers discover that the vaccination is not their enemy, that number should rise — and rise quickly.
Because, honestly, what do you have to be afraid of?
Vaccines have been given to tens of millions of individuals with few, if any, negative effects, and the vaccines are universally regarded as both safe and efficient.
Not to mention the fact that these are athletes who take a chance on their long-term health every time they take the field.
They have little to worry from a small side effect or two from a injection if they can risk having their brains scrambled and getting CTE from playing football.
You don’t want to get vaccinated in order to play?
Instead of wearing a helmet, why not just play without one?
To be clear, the NFL does not mandate that players be vaccinated.
They can choose whether or not to get their vaccinations, as long as they are willing to live with the consequences.
The league, on the other hand, is making it so tough to play the upcoming season without being vaccinated that the list of criteria and penalties for those who aren’t vaccinated has become a de facto mandate.
It isn’t always a terrible thing.
While the majority of Americans are getting vaccinated, those who refuse are increasing infection and hospitalization rates, prolonging a pandemic that has already lasted far too long.
And, in the end, the NFL is a $16 billion a year enterprise.
It can take measures it believes essential to protect that cash flow, subject to specific limitations stated forth in the contract with its players union.
The league isn’t the only one.
California and New York City also announced proposals on Monday to compel employees to be vaccinated or tested weekly.
Companies all throughout the country are following suit.
Sure, anti-vaxxers are enraged and vocal.
It’s difficult to ignore them, even if their teachings are frequently conflicting and illogical.
They have no right, however, to jeopardize the health – and livelihood – of those who follow the science and do the right thing.
This is especially true in the NFL, where players and coaches share locker rooms and on-field interaction is not just allowed but encouraged.
The number of NFL players who have received at least one shot is substantially higher than the general population, according to Allen Sills, the league’s senior medical officer.
Once the camps begin, he predicts that vaccinations will rise.
“There’s been a lot of activity there,” Sills remarked.
“As additional players arrive at training camp, more players will begin that procedure,” the players have been officially reminded.
The consequences for interfering with the season have been established.
And, by now, those who haven’t been vaccinated should realize how serious the league is about vaccines.
___ Tim Dahlberg is an Associated Press national sports columnist.
Send him an email at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/timdahlberg.